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Hey everyone my name is Jeff and I've been riding a sportbike (Honda CBR) for quite a few years now. I have always loved cruisers, even had a VStar 1300 for a short while, and I'm getting kind of tired of riding the CBR. I want to get back on a cruiser and trade-in or privately sell my CBR.

I went into Mission Motorsports in Irvine, and they had a Fury and a Sabre. The Fury was pretty bada$$, but I like the practicality of the Sabre more. I love the looks of the Sabre, but I want to be able to take this bike on long rides too. I'm not sure if this is a good choice for me, considering the front wheel is kind of thin and would be harder to ride long distances and wear fairly fast with some mileage. I think a VTX would be a better choice, but they are not making them anymore and I am kind of OCD and I want something NEW and UPDATED. Also thought about the Stateline, but I don't like the huge fenders.

Then I went into Orange County HD, and sat on a few bikes. I sat on some Sportster models (Nightster and Fourty-Eight) and also sat on a couple of the Dyna models. (Street Bob and Super Glide.) The Sportsters felt kind of small, so I am thinking if I get a Harley, I should get a Dyna.

I want a bike that I will mainly ride by myself, but also want to be able to throw my girlfriend on the back of and cruise.
Any suggestions and or experience with both? Anything will help me out and make a decision. What made you choose a Honda over a Harley or any other type of cruiser? Thanks everyone!
 

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well for one thing $$$..another was i like the way the interstate fit me...relyability played a big part also..i have a friend that rides a harley and from the factory it comes equipped with hazard light...that struck me as odd..so i asked him why? do they leave ya on the side of the road? he is know looking to upgrade to a honda
 

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WHYNOT
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I'm an HD owner and just bought a Honda Interstate. As stated above, cheaper, more reliable, smoother running, no chains or belts. I like my HD's, but it came down to miles per dollar, hard to beat a Honda in that department. The only thing I don't like about the Honda is to many plastic parts. As for the hazard lights, all bikes should have them, you never know when you might be in a position where you want to be sure to be seen.
 

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lol this is true whynot...i like plastic more because its cheaper to fix and or replace...after my buddy with the hd and i go for a ride he is always sore and im left wanting more...insurance is cheaper also..i have been asked several times where i bought my hd from and they give me a really puzzled look when i tell them its a honda
 

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Peace
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Thanks for the replies guys! :)

This forum is quite slow it seems, but also seems like it is still growing. :)
Yup, Site is definetley still growing, but with a great group of riders.
I choose the Honda Interstate because of reliability and cost. I am also partial to Honda. I have riding Honda on the street and dirt ever since I was a young kid back in the late 60's. Nothing beats a Honda. I have had a few others such as HD, Suzuki and Yamaha but I like the Honda BEST.
 

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When I went bike shopping I was originally intent on getting a Harley. After sitting on many and test riding a few, I decided to look around at other rides. My next idea was a Yamaha V-star (thats what my brother rides). I couldn't test ride any, but wasnt comfortable sitting on any either. When I finnaly went over and sat on the Interstate it felt right and a I knew that I found what I was looking for. The fact that I was already riding a honda 750 had no bearing on my choice. That was a great ride too, but too small for the kind of riding I wanted to do. The Interstate had the bags and shield which was a must for my riding desires (Long rides). I have learned over the years you just can't get enough storage on a motorcycle (specially if you want to take trips that keep you away from home for up to a week at a time) I have one whole bag dedicated just to things like a hub lock, rain gear, space blankets, emergency medical kit, extra gloves and sunglasses, pain pills (getting old and stiff) and bike cleaning supplies. I have a tool kit up front completely loaded with everything (including a spare oil filter) that I might need on the road. Plastic wire ties are great to throw in this bag, you never know when you have to tie something in place. All in all that leaves me with my Kyryakyn Grand touring bag, Roll bag and one saddle bag for cloths. The two biggest extra additions that are a must are a great comfortable seat (perferably with a removable rider backrest) and highway bars/engine guards with adjustable highway pegs attached. I can cruise all day in a reclined position and never feel road fatigue. The more comfortable your ride, the more time you'll spend on it. The Interstate gives me the comfort and storage I like, plus it still allows me to sit back in that easy rider cruising position which makes even Ferrari drivers wish they were on my bike instead of in their expensive car.
 

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The stateline is my third Honda. I knew as soon as I sat on it (at a bike show in Dallas a few months before they actually went on sale) it was for me. My previous bike was a VTX 1300R. I sold that to my old man a couple of years ago. My decision was driven by four critical factors: comfort, dependability, cost and my wife actually gave it to me as a surpise gift (she's got to be cheating on me...oh well, it's worth it!).

I love all things on two wheels. It's happenstance that I have owned three Honda's. I like the idea of Harley. I looked at the heritage, pre-2004 fat boys, street bob, and springer because all of those tend to have shorter seat heights and my legs are kinda stubby. But, at the end of the day, you're not riding an idea. Anybody who has put serious miles on a bike knows it's about ergonomics and dependability. I have had very good experiences with the drive shaft and I like the fuel injection. And, oh yeah, a certain amount of style is nice too but I consider this the least important because tastes are fleeting and it is the easiest part to remedy.

Cost is another factor but I think it is better to focus on cost of ownership as opposed to initial investment. Honda's (and probably other metrics although I have not done those comparisons) are much cheaper to fix, maintain, and accessorize than both Victory and Harley. The statelines have less options at the moment in terms of accessories but they are still new. Although, depending on the models you're looking at it is quite possible you will find that the Harley's do a little better gas mileage wise.
 
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