Honda VT1300 Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since there has been so much discussion here about wind deflectors, I thought I'd share some info on my do-it-myself wind deflector project. It cost me about $45 and took about 2 hours.

The hardest part to find were P clamps big enough to go over the fork covers. Finally found some 2.6" ones at an industrial plumbing supply shop, they were about $2 each. They were dipped in black plactic, like the plastic on pliar handles. Got a 24" by 18" by .093 thick sheet of lexan at Home Depot for about $25. For mounting hardware I used stainless steel hardware - 4 each 1 1/4" long by 1/4" bolts, cap nuts, and 8 large diameter washers.

I cut two 4' wide lexan strips, 18 inches long on a table saw, no problems with chipping, etc. since I left the plastic on. I initially wasn't sure how long to make them, but 18" looked nice, as it reaches from the windshield almost all the way to the reflectors on the forks near the axel. Used my chop saw to eyeball a big 45 degree cut on the bottom outside corner and a small 45 on the top outside corner, and I rounded them off with a belt sander. I also rounded off the inside corners so they weren't sharp.

I was working alone, and the P clamps were pretty stiff, so I used a clamp to hold the clamps in place on the fork covers. I used a sharpie to mark where to drill the upper mounting hole in the lexan, then I used the mounting hardware to temporarily hold the lexan in the upper clamp while I sharpie marked and drilled the lower hole in the lexan. I purposefully overlapped the top 1" of the deflectors with the lower 1" of the windshield. I angled them about the same angle as the windshield.

Once I was happy with the setup on the right side of the fork I marked through the holes on the first sheet onto the other lexan sheet, drilled them, and mounted both deflectors. The upper P clamp is right below the lower triple mount for the forks, the lower P clamps are next to the fender where the fork cover ends.

They made a big difference on the wind buffetting. I've not ridden with an aftermarket windshield or the commercially available deflectors, but mine are longer than the photos I've seen of the Memphis Shades deflectors. Even at 80 MPH these barely move. I was initially worrked that .093 lexan would vibrate too much - if it did I was going to add reinforcing metal strips along the inner edge, but they seem to be sturdy enough. I just returned from a 1300 mile ride to the tip of Vancouver Island in Canada, and they are showing no signs of cracking.

I'll attach a few photos that hopefully show what I tried to describe above.

Hiker Todd Gesture Font Wood Material property Thumb
Wheel Tire Vehicle Automotive lighting Motor vehicle
Tire Wheel Fuel tank Vehicle Automotive lighting
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Bicycle tire Automotive lighting
Tire Wheel Bicycle Bicycle tire Automotive tire
Tire Wheel Fuel tank Automotive lighting Motor vehicle
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,401 Posts
Looks good nice job and if it works for you that's all that counts
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
443 Posts
Maybe you can mass produce those. A couple of thoughts. I would stop the height at the bottom of the windscreen. I would prefer the mounts to be chrome to match the fork covers rather than black. Your deflectors, however, are sweet.
 

·
Jabirwocky
Joined
·
842 Posts
I agree with you bill, about the height....but there is a guy making and selling them on the V-Star forum that is high like that or maybe a big higher.

The only thing I can gather from all the praise for them is that by directing more flow directly behind the shield, it reduces pressure causing less buffeting.

I made some for my interstate before that helped a lot. I'm working on a set now for my new bike and going to experiment on the different lengths.

Gotta verify this design difference for myself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
443 Posts
Excellent point. I have seen some interesting ways people try to put air behind the windscreen to reduce the low pressure. The chaps on my engine guards completes the elimination of the wind buffeting for me and keeps the low pressure behind the windscreen, which, to me is a good thing. I could probably smoke a cigarette at 75 mph now and my sun glasses stay on with no helmet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Got some lexan in my buddy's garage, I will be using that. I will paint it black (it is smoked now) and I will also paint the end of the P clamps and bolts black.

On another note, yesterday I took off the leather chaps off the engine guard and...lo and behold, what a sweet ride this bike is without them on !!

When I picked up the bike it was cold, about 28-30F, so I put them on before even my first ride. Of course I did get a lot of buffeting, and reading on this forums that they help a lot, I left them on. I took them off yesterday and I can easily go 70-75 mph with manageable head movement, whereas before it was an issue after 50mph.

The bike feels lighter, i can feel no drag, and the front end wobbling is 90% gone at highway speeds. I bet my mpg is better now.

With the lowers on, this will be one sweet ride. Finally I can go on the highway ! Yaaay road trips !!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Lowers done. They look OK if you ask me. I am not that picky when it comes to these things, especially when they work just fine. Chin/face wind is now basically eliminated; I still get a bit of head movement, I traced it back to the low windshield which will be replaced by a fairing soon.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
I might add the following

First-make sure you use Lexan and not Polycarbanate(it is brittle)

Second- drill slowly with light pressure.

I made a set for my Suzi Blvd. that I have moved over to the Interstate and am going to try them this week end. If they work I'm going to pretty them up for my new ride.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top