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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What, if anything, did you guys do special during your break-in perdion (the first 600 miles)?

The salesman told me that I could rev the engine up, just to not gun it.

Did you all do this? Does it really matter?

Thanks in advance for any advice.
 

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I just kind of drove it normally for the first 500 miles. The last 100 miles I did in one day on the open road at Interstate speeds of 65-85 mph. 100 Miles can go fast on the open road.
 

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WHYNOT
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Avoid Real high RPM's, you don't want to just "cruise" either, you want to run it through the entire RPM range and back off the throttle once in a while. The idea is that bearings and such will break in un-even, it helps set the rings too when you decel and accel rather than holding a constant RPM. You don't want to baby it the entire time either, ride it like you would on a normal basis, but don't over rev.
 

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My brother's theory is ride them normal for about 500 miles then ride them hard until the warranty expires, by then if it's going to break it would have.

You really cant over rpm the bike. I tried already and when you over rpm the engine it disengages the drive shaft and takes the load off the engine. Your bike will seem to go into neutral until you back off the throttle. Thats why they don't have a tachometer installed, they made it so you can't over rpm the bike. So get down and have fun, you'll get the feel for when to shift at the optimum time for max performance as you test the boundries.
 

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WHYNOT
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My brother's theory is ride them normal for about 500 miles then ride them hard until the warranty expires, by then if it's going to break it would have.

You really cant over rpm the bike. I tried already and when you over rpm the engine it disengages the drive shaft and takes the load off the engine. Your bike will seem to go into neutral until you back off the throttle. Thats why they don't have a tachometer installed, they made it so you can't over rpm the bike. So get down and have fun, you'll get the feel for when to shift at the optimum time for max performance as you test the boundries.
Good to know about the RPM and the disengagement of the drive. I was wondering if there was rev limiter or...??
 

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My guess is that it's electronically limited and when the computer reads a certain rpm an electro magnet (relay) activates and disengages the clutch plate. At least thats how I would set up an rpm limiter if I were to do it.

I've been thinking about ways to compress the air (heat it up) as it goes through the air intake, this would increase engine efficiency. Mixing hot air with the fuel would cause it to ignite better and burn more thouroughly during combustion; increasing power and reducing emissions at the same time. A turbo charged motorcycle? Having more then one spark plug per cyclinder is one answer, but I think they did that more to offset the addition of ethanol to the fuel more then to increase power.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Simple rev limiters just cut the fuel/spark. Your computer knows how fast the engine is spinning and knows that it shouldn't pass a certain point, so it cuts out to stop you and warn you. I believe that just disconnecting the clutch would remove all load from the engine and therefore cause it to rev up more.

Also, compressing air does heat it up, but the heat is not what helps with power. The heat actually hurts power. The colder the air is, the more dense it is, and the more oxygen molecules there are in it. More oxygen allows for more fuel to be burned. So... More air (oxygen) + more fuel = more boom (power)

This is why turbochargers and superchargers use intercoolers. The colder, denser air increases both power and efficiency.

In naturally-aspirated (NA) cars there is about a 1% horsepower gain for every 10 degrees the air temperature drops. This is a rough estimation. In forced-induction (superchargers or turbochargers) the difference is even more noticeable.

I live in South Florida (read almost never cold) and can still remember my old turbocharged car feeling completely different on those two or so "cold" nights a year when we dipped into the 40s.

I make no claims to be an expert, so if anyone can point out where/why I am mistaken please do. I'm on here to learn.
 
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